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Patricia Garcia
patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca

This Week on W5 – CREEP OUT and ELECTRIC POW WOW

Airdate: Saturday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV GO, and CTVNews.ca

Promo for W5’s episode this week: Available on W5’s Facebook Page

Video Clips: Available upon request to Patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca

Interview Opportunities: Jon Woodward is available for interviews tomorrowFriday, Feb. 17. Please contact patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca with interview requests.

KEY STORYLINE: This week in “CREEP OUT”, W5 is catching out some Creep Catchers – a vigilante group that targets and confronts suspected pedophiles using smart phones, cameras, and social media platforms. By 2016, more than a dozen groups across Canada working under the Creep Catchers banner lured, shamed, and posted videos of suspected pedophiles, gaining millions of views of their recorded confrontations. But as W5 reveals, not all “catches” are cut and dry.

W5’s Jon Woodward identifies instances where Creep Catchers have outed potentially innocent individuals, using tactics that include entrapment, intimidation, and harassment. W5 also examines the online business model that generates revenue through website ads by driving video views, likes and shares, soliciting for donations, and even selling branded clothing.

Also this week, W5 Host and Managing Editor Kevin Newman delivers “ELECTRIC POW WOW”, an in-depth profile on Canadian electronic music group A Tribe Called Red. With three nominations for 2107 JUNO Awards, the group’s music, which blends traditional Latin and hip hop rhythms, heavy base-driven beats of dubstep, and the powerful and ancient music and culture of Canada’s First Nations, has attracted a growing fan base in Canada and across the world. Group members Ian Campeau, Tim Hill, and Ehren Thomas, discuss their lives, early musical influences, and their role in building bridges between cultures by broadening cultural awareness and understanding of aboriginal issues from oil and gas pipelines, to reconciling the dark past of Canada’s residential schools.

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Patricia Garcia
patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca

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This Week on W5 – CREEP OUT and ELECTRIC POW WOW

Airdate: Saturday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV GO, and CTVNews.ca

Promo for W5’s episode this week: Available on W5’s Facebook Page

Video Clips: Available upon request to Patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca

Interview Opportunities: Jon Woodward is available for interviews tomorrowFriday, Feb. 17. Please contact patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca with interview requests.

KEY STORYLINE: This week in “CREEP OUT”, W5 is catching out some Creep Catchers – a vigilante group that targets and confronts suspected pedophiles using smart phones, cameras, and social media platforms. By 2016, more than a dozen groups across Canada working under the Creep Catchers banner lured, shamed, and posted videos of suspected pedophiles, gaining millions of views of their recorded confrontations. But as W5 reveals, not all “catches” are cut and dry.

W5’s Jon Woodward identifies instances where Creep Catchers have outed potentially innocent individuals, using tactics that include entrapment, intimidation, and harassment. W5 also examines the online business model that generates revenue through website ads by driving video views, likes and shares, soliciting for donations, and even selling branded clothing.

Also this week, W5 Host and Managing Editor Kevin Newman delivers “ELECTRIC POW WOW”, an in-depth profile on Canadian electronic music group A Tribe Called Red. With three nominations for 2107 JUNO Awards, the group’s music, which blends traditional Latin and hip hop rhythms, heavy base-driven beats of dubstep, and the powerful and ancient music and culture of Canada’s First Nations, has attracted a growing fan base in Canada and across the world. Group members Ian Campeau, Tim Hill, and Ehren Thomas, discuss their lives, early musical influences, and their role in building bridges between cultures by broadening cultural awareness and understanding of aboriginal issues from oil and gas pipelines, to reconciling the dark past of Canada’s residential schools.

For more information

Patricia Garcia

patricia.garcia@bellmedia.ca

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