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Zak Fairbrother
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Alyssa Roy
Alyssa.Roy@bellmedia.ca

This Week on W5 – NUCLEAR TOMB Airing Saturday, April 1 on CTV

Airdate: Saturday, April 1 at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV GO, and CTVNews.ca

Promo for W5’s episode this week: Available on W5’s Facebook Page

Video Clips: Available upon request to zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca

Interview Opportunities: Please contact zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca for interview requests.

KEY STORYLINE
This week in “Nuclear Tomb”, W5’s Lloyd Robertson heads to Kincardine, Ont., an idyllic cottage destination along the banks of picturesque Lake Huron. Home to nearly 12,000 residents, Kincardine is also the home of Bruce Power, the world’s largest nuclear power station – a private facility under lease from Ontario Power Generation (OPG). While nuclear power may be praised for being clean and cheap, it creates an unwelcome dilemma: nuclear waste, and what to do with it.

W5 spotlights OPG’s waste management system and its plans to build an underground bunker known as a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) to contain some of Ontario’s nuclear waste. To date, 187 counties and governments around the Great Lakes including Toronto, Hamilton, and Chicago have passed resolutions against OPG’s proposal, and more than 150,000 people have signed petitions against it.

Robertson interviews residents, activist groups, and politicians on both sides of the border to spotlight how the DGR project – with a proposed site only 1.2 kilometres from Lake Huron, part of the Great Lakes system and a source of drinking water for more than 40 million people – is dividing communities concerned with the safe and secure storage of nuclear waste.

W5 hears from frustrated citizens in Port Huron, Michigan, just across the lake from Kincardine, who fail to understand why this location for the repository is even a consideration. Michigan Congressman, Dan Kildee, who is one of 32 members of Congress calling on Ottawa not to approve the site tells W5: “…it defies logic that there isn’t a better location.”

Robertson also interviews OPG CEO Jeffrey Lyash, who insists the underground storage of nuclear waste can be safely, efficiently, and effectively isolated from the environment.

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Zak Fairbrother
zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca
Alyssa Roy
Alyssa.Roy@bellmedia.ca

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This Week on W5 – NUCLEAR TOMB Airing Saturday, April 1 on CTV

Airdate: Saturday, April 1 at 7 p.m. ET/PT on CTV, CTV GO, and CTVNews.ca

Promo for W5’s episode this week: Available on W5’s Facebook Page

Video Clips: Available upon request to zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca

Interview Opportunities: Please contact zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca for interview requests.

KEY STORYLINE
This week in “Nuclear Tomb”, W5’s Lloyd Robertson heads to Kincardine, Ont., an idyllic cottage destination along the banks of picturesque Lake Huron. Home to nearly 12,000 residents, Kincardine is also the home of Bruce Power, the world’s largest nuclear power station – a private facility under lease from Ontario Power Generation (OPG). While nuclear power may be praised for being clean and cheap, it creates an unwelcome dilemma: nuclear waste, and what to do with it.

W5 spotlights OPG’s waste management system and its plans to build an underground bunker known as a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) to contain some of Ontario’s nuclear waste. To date, 187 counties and governments around the Great Lakes including Toronto, Hamilton, and Chicago have passed resolutions against OPG’s proposal, and more than 150,000 people have signed petitions against it.

Robertson interviews residents, activist groups, and politicians on both sides of the border to spotlight how the DGR project – with a proposed site only 1.2 kilometres from Lake Huron, part of the Great Lakes system and a source of drinking water for more than 40 million people – is dividing communities concerned with the safe and secure storage of nuclear waste.

W5 hears from frustrated citizens in Port Huron, Michigan, just across the lake from Kincardine, who fail to understand why this location for the repository is even a consideration. Michigan Congressman, Dan Kildee, who is one of 32 members of Congress calling on Ottawa not to approve the site tells W5: “…it defies logic that there isn’t a better location.”

Robertson also interviews OPG CEO Jeffrey Lyash, who insists the underground storage of nuclear waste can be safely, efficiently, and effectively isolated from the environment.

For more information

Zak Fairbrother

zak.fairbrother@bellmedia.ca

Alyssa Roy

Alyssa.Roy@bellmedia.ca

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